Criminal Programs

Gain experience and first-hand knowledge of the criminal justice system through Georgia Law's criminal programs. For more information, please visit our FAQ page. Explore:

 

Criminal Defense Clinic

The Criminal Defense Clinic is an excellent opportunity for students interested in becoming defense lawyers, prosecutors and public defenders. Law students work with attorneys in the Western Circuit Public Defender Office, interviewing clients, investigating cases, negotiating plea agreements, and appearing in court. Third-year students routinely represent clients in pre-trial hearings and trials.

Prosecutorial Clinic

The Prosecutorial Clinic teaches students trial techniques, making it ideal for students who want to litigate immediately after graduation. The program is 3 semesters long and includes classroom instruction and an externship in a prosecutor's office in or near Athens. During the externship, students can observe all phases of a criminal trial, research various questions of law and draft legal memoranda and charging documents. Students are also authorized to participate in preliminary hearings, motion hearings, arraignments, juvenile adjudications, probation revocations, grand jury proceedings and jury trials.

Capital Assistance Project

The Capital Assistance Project was initiated in 1998 at the request of the Supreme Court of Georgia. Here, students work at agencies defending individuals charged with or convicted of capital crimes and undertake valuable research and writing projects to assist agency attorneys with these cases.

 

 

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Learn about opportunities at Georgia Law that match your interests. Communicate with faculty and students and track your application status.

 

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Faculty Insight

"The Criminal Defense Clinic, in collaboration with the Western Circuit Public Defender Office, serves as a teaching law office.  Students work with attorneys on criminal cases and see how the law they've been studying in the classroom is applied in the courtroom.  When they return to the classroom, it's with increased confidence and enthusiasm for the study and practice of law."

 

Russell C. Gabriel, J.D. ‘85
Criminal Defense Clinic Director