Error message

An illegal choice has been detected. Please contact the site administrator.
masthead

Course Offerings

You will find a broad and challenging curriculum at Georgia Law - nearly 170 courses are offered, although not all of the listed courses are taught each year. First-year students are just as likely to encounter a tenured or chaired faculty member in the classroom as they are a junior professor.  Distinguished visitors and adjuncts supplement the faculty and diversify the upper-level curriculum. Not all listed courses are offered each semester. Periodically, other courses are offered.  Unless otherwise noted, all law courses carry the prefix "JURI." 

CURRENT STUDENTS: For the upcoming academic year, awlays visit the Class Schedules & Registration webpage for requirement lists and guidelines including 2L Writing, Advanced Writing, Capstone, and Practical Skills requirements.

To search by JURI number or course name, visit our custom course search.

Watch a selection of faculty video Insights for guidance in choosing courses.

  • Community Health Law Partnership Clinic , JURI 5628S, 5629L , Credit Hours: 2 semester clinic; 4 hours each semester (2 hours graded; 2 hours pass/fail)
    The Community Health Law Partnership Clinic will partner with health care professionals to tackle a variety of legal needs that impact patients, including immigration, disability rights, benefits, and family law. Students will have direct responsibility for all aspects of client representation in cases undertaken by the clinic, including the opportunity to interview and advise potential clients, to conduct research and draft legal documents, to advocate in court proceedings and administrative hearings, and to foster inter-professional approaches to holistic problem solving. From time to time, students may also have the opportunity to develop training materials for medical providers, legal advocates, or patients, and engage in related policy work. The weekly seminar component of the clinic provides skills training, substantive instruction, and “case rounds.” This is a year-long (two semester) clinic and is awarded 4 credits per semester. Begins fall 2014.

  • Comparative Constitutional Law , JURI 4185 , Credit Hours: 3
    Why do we have a constitution? In what ways is our constitution different than those adopted in other nations? Are there things our constitutions could do better? This course explores questions like these in a comparative perspective. We will explore the different ways nations have addressed the common problems constitutions attempt to solve, such as the structural organization of governments and the protection of individual rights. In doing so, we will consider the relationships between constitutions and judicial review; the significance of written versus unwritten constitutions; and the pros and cons of comparative consideration of such questions.  In doing so, we will study constitutional arrangements in the United States, and in other countries including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Israel, Japan, and South Africa. Specific topics of study will include (1) the relationships between elected branches of government and courts under constitutional regimes that permit legislative override of constitutional decisions, (2) presidential compared to parliamentary systems of governance; (3) different forms of constitutional federalism, (4) approaches to protecting minority groups (for example, federalism, affirmative action for racial/ethnic/linguistic minorities, or group-based rights), (5) gender equality; (6) freedom of religion, (7) freedom of speech, and (8) positive social welfare rights.   The course will be graded through a combination of class participation, occasional written or in-class assignments, and a take-home exam.  There are no prerequisites for the course, although a familiarity with U.S. constitutional law would be helpful.

  • Comparative Corporate Law , JURI 4400 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: 4210
    This seminar examines corporate law and the corporate form from a comparative perspective, with particular emphasis placed on how large publicly traded companies are governed and regulated in some of the world’s leading commercial and financial jurisdictions.

  • Complex Litigation , JURI 5560 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course examines the theory and practice of complex multiparty cases. In particular, it examines the major procedural and substantive issues in nationwide class actions and non-class aggregation. Our readings and discussions will focus on class actions (including the requirements for class certification, dueling state and federal class actions, and the strategic implications involved in settlement) and other advanced procedural topics including joinder, multidistrict litigation, phased trials, and preclusion.

  • Conflict of Laws , JURI 4410 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course examines the ways in which the courts of a nation or state seek to resolve legal disputes in which other nations or states have an interest.  The course will focus on two topics:  the jurisdiction of courts over persons or things involved in international or interstate legal disputes; and choice of law, the question of which jurisdiction’s law should apply in a given international or interstate legal dispute.  In addition, the course will cover the impact of the Constitution on jurisdictional issues, choice of law determinations, and the effect of state court judgments and decrees outside of the rendering state.  Other topics that could be covered include: conflicts between federal and state law; the effect given foreign nations’ judgments in domestic courts; and the extraterritorial application of federal law.

  • Constitutional Law I , JURI 4180 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the meaning and impact of the Constitution of the United States, particularly with regard to the subjects of federalism, separation of powers, the judicial function and due process of law.

  • Constitutional Law II , JURI 4190 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on constitutional protections of liberty and equality apart from protections that stem from principles of substantive and procedural due process. Subjects typically covered in the course include the Contract Clause, equal protection, freedom of expression, the right to free exercise of religion and the prohibition of laws respecting an establishment of religion.

  • Constitutional Law II , JURI 4190E , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on constitutional protections of liberty and equality apart from protections that stem from principles of substantive and procedural due process. Subjects typically covered in the course include the Contract Clause, equal protection, freedom of expression, the right to free exercise of religion and the prohibition of laws respecting an establishment of religion. This course will be taught as a blended learning course. It will meet each Tuesday in person. On Fridays, it will sometimes meet in person, and sometimes virtually. In addition, some Friday classes will be replaced by podcasts that students can listen to at their leisure, together with writing assignments and small group meetings. Please email Professor Levin with any questions (hlevin@uga.edu).

  • Constitutional Litigation , JURI 4420 , Credit Hours: 3
    Addresses a number of issues arising in damages actions brought under 42 U.S.C. Section 1983, which authorizes a cause of action against persons who violate constitutional rights under color of state law. Topics covered may include distinction between common law and constitutional torts, scope of governmental liability, official immunity, damages, causation, state court suits, procedural defenses, attorney's fees, and meaning of "under color of." Suits against federal officers, under principle established in Bivens v. Six Federal Narcotics Agents, may also be discussed.

  • Constitutional Theory , JURI 4196 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: JURI 4180
    This course will investigate the history and theory surrounding the creation and ratification of the American Constitution. Attention will focus on the work of Madison, Hamilton, and other leading thinkers at the time of the founding. Areas of study will include the Constitutional Convention, the ratification process, and the activities of anti-federalist critics of the Constitution. Readings will be drawn from both original and secondary materials, with special emphasis placed on The Federalist Papers. Student responsibilities will include regular attendance at, thoughtful preparation for and active participation in class sessions. The major determinant of the student's grade will be work done in connection with a written project concerning the founding period, to be approved by the professor and presented to the class in the final weeks of the semester. The paper will be designed to satisfy the law school’s writing requirement.

  • Consumer Law , JURI 4177 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course considers numerous legal issues concerning consumers’ commercial transactions, including the following key topics: disclosure of information to consumers, consumer credit, predatory-lending prohibitions, consumer-credit reporting, privacy related to consumer transactions (both online and offline), consumer-product warranties, debt collection, and dispute-resolution methods.

  • Contemporary Issues in Business Law , JURI 4365 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210 and/or an undergraduate degree in business, economics, or finance
    This seminar examines contemporary issues that are prevalent in the regulation of business organizations and activities. At the beginning of the semester, each student registered for the class will select a research topic from a menu of choices provided by the course instructor. The student will then meet with the course instructor to discuss research plans and schedule a time for an in-class presentation of the topic. Each student is required to submit a presentation outline before his or her presentation, and a final paper on the chosen topic at the end of the semester.

  • Contract Drafting for Startups and New Ventures , JURI 5456 , Credit Hours: 2
    The fundamentals of contract drafting applied to the context of fast growth technology startups and other new business ventures. Students will be introduced to multiple concepts including: interviewing clients, avoiding ambiguity, considering legal consequences, understanding core contract concepts, and reviewing and revising based on negotiations. This course will require students to produce successive drafts of documents that incorporate feedback from the professor.

  • Contracts , JURI 4030 , Credit Hours: 4
    Contracts provides an introduction to the law of legally enforceable promises under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the common law. Among other topics, the course considers offers and their acceptance; consideration, formalities, and promissory estoppel; the parole evidence rule and the statute of frauds; third-party enforcement; material breach of contract; and damages. Students are expected to be able to explain in writing how these and additional legal issues under the UCC and the common law apply to various complex factual scenarios.

  • Copyright Law , JURI 4430 , Credit Hours: 2
    Focus is upon various methods to protect literary, musical, and artistic work under law of copyright. Copyright is a statutory subject based upon Copyright Act of 1909 and its amendments and Copyright Act of 1976. The course deals with what can be copyrighted, infringement actions, rights enjoyed by the copyright proprietor, jurisdiction and various remedies. Students in the class of 2013 and later are encouraged to take the IP Survey course before taking this course. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Corporate Compliance: Controls and Breakdowns , JURI 5643 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course examines the legal underpinnings and structural components of the compliance function in corporations.   It reviews the key compliance issues for public companies, banks, and accounting firms, among other organizations, and deconstructs past compliance failures.  The course also analyzes the role of attorneys working with, and as, compliance professionals.

  • Corporate Counsel Externship , JURI 5968S, 5969E , Credit Hours: 4 - 6 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210 and JURI 4300
    This course explores the practice of law from the perspective of an in-house counsel. Students will spend 1-2 days each week in a corporate legal department where they will have work assignments and experience firsthand the inner workings of a legal department. A 2-hour seminar each week will supplement the on-site work with discussions about relevant substantive topics and opportunities to build skills through drafting projects and simulations. In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare an appraisal with critical reflections about their externship and an oral presentation.

  • Corporate Counsel Externship , JURI 5968S, 5969E , Credit Hours: 4 - 6 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210 and JURI 4300
    This course explores the practice of law from the perspective of an in-house counsel. Students will spend 1-2 days each week in a corporate legal department where they will have work assignments and experience firsthand the inner workings of a legal department. A 2-hour seminar each week will supplement the on-site work with discussions about relevant substantive topics and opportunities to build skills through drafting projects and simulations. In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare an appraisal with critical reflections about their externship and an oral presentation.

  • Corporate Finance , JURI 4441 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: 4210
    This course teaches concepts and methodologies used by corporations in major financing activities, as well as legal issues that may arise in those activities. Course materials are divided into four parts: equity financing, debt financing, valuation methodologies, and financial derivatives. For equity financing, discussions will focus on the IPO process, ADRs and GDRs, rights offerings and stock repurchases. For debt financing, discussions will focus on bond features and trading environment, bond issuance, valuation and risk management, convertible bonds, key provisions in an indenture and legal implications, characteristics of medium term notes and commercial paper programs. For valuation methodologies, discussions will focus on discounted cash flows, net present values, and dividend discount models. For financial derivatives, discussions will focus on options trading, pricing and risk management, the futures market and interest rate swaps.

  • Corporate Litigation , JURI 5595 , Credit Hours: 1 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210
    This course explores the inner workings of expedited and summary litigation, problems in the organization and functioning of a corporation, and mergers and transfers of control. Students will be given the opportunity for hands on experience in litigating corporate cases through oral argument. This course will also include discussion of the scholarly theories of corporate law, statutory and judicial law relating to corporations, and Delaware's prominence in corporate law.

  • Corporate Responsibility , JURI 4765 , Credit Hours: 1
    The great economist and Nobel Laureate Milton Friedman famously stated that a corporation has "one and only one social responsibility - to increase its profits." Is this true today? As evidenced by the passage of the landmark Dodd-Frank legislation in 2010, the conduct and performance of several of America's leading corporations in recent years have seriously undermined confidence in U.S. businesses and their leaders. This course will explore contemporary trends in corporate governance and will examine whether a responsible corporation can integrate relevant societal concerns, such as environmental matters, and actually strengthen long-term shareholder value and the sustainability of both the corporation and the society in which is exists.

  • Corporate Tax , JURI 4600 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: JURI 5120
    This course covers the taxation of corporations and their shareholders.  Major topics include:  contributions of property to corporations, distributions and redemptions by corporations, and taxable and tax-free mergers and acquisitions.

  • Corporations , JURI 4210 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examination of problems in the organization and functioning of a corporation, including such matters as disregard of the corporate entity, management and control, federal regulation of insider trading, proxy solicitation and shareholder voting, derivative actions, and special problems of the close corporation.

  • Criminal Defense Practicum I , JURI 5170S , Credit Hours: 3
    This course offers students an eye-witness, hands-on experience with the criminal justice system from the perspective of a public defender office. Students work with the eighteen attorneys in the Western Judicial Circuit Public Defender Office in Athens (a five minute walk from the Law School). Students assist with the entire range of legal representation of indigent clientsinterviewing clients, interviewing witnesses, conducting other aspects of factual investigation, drafting motions, negotiating pleas, and assisting with trials, drafting appellate briefs. This course is a pre-requisite to Criminal Defense Practicum II, in which students, supervised by a licensed attorney, can represent clients in all manner of court proceedings including jury trials. There are no pre-requisites for this course.  

  • Criminal Defense Practicum II , JURI 4500S, 4501L , Credit Hours: 4-6 , Prerequisite: JURI 5170S
    This course is open only to students who have taken at least one semester of Criminal Defense Practicum I. Students in this course continue to work with individual attorneys in the Western Circuit Public Defender Office in Athens.  Placement in other PD offices in Georgia are available in the summer only. The Criminal Defense Practicum offers an immersion in the criminal justice system from the perspective of a public defender office. Attorneys in the PD office are full-time criminal defense lawyers and therefore are specialists. All of their work concentrates on criminal defense.  Students assist with all aspects of the representation, and under Georgia’s Student Practice Rule students handle preliminary hearings, bond hearings, pre-trial motion hearings such as motions to suppress, trials, pleas, sentencings and probation revocation hearings, and assist with all of the factual and legal investigation which is necessary to effective legal representation. There are no  pre-requisites other than Criminal Defense Clinic I, but Evidence and Criminal Procedure I are very strongly recommended, and a Trial Practice course or Mock Trial experience may be helpful. (4500 is the graded portion of the course, and 4501L is the pass/fail portion. Register for both when registering for this course.)   

Pages