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ABA Required Disclosures 2016

PART VIII, DISCLOSURES REQUIRES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION

THE CRITERIA FOR APPROVAL OF FOREIGN SUMMER AND INTERSESSION PROGRAMS ESTABLISHED BY ABA-APPROVED LAW SCHOOLS WAS REVISED IN AUGUST 2010. SPECIFIC INFORMATION MUST BE DISCLOSED TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS FROM THE INITIAL POINT OF CONTACT. THE COMPLETE ABA STATEMENT IS AVAILABLE ON THEIR WEBSITE:

http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/foreign_study.html.

Georgia Law Global Governance Summer School

ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools 2015-2016 158

 

1.     Dates, location(s), description of the program, and anticipated enrollment:

Location and Dates: Leuven, Belgium, July 10-30, 2016

Program Description: Since 1973, the Dean Rusk International Law Center at the University of Georgia School of Law has been pleased to host summer study abroad in Belgium. In summer 2016, the Center plans to offer an ABA-approved 4-credit Global Governance Summer School in partnership with the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, University of Leuven/KU Leuven, one of Belgium’s premier research institutions. Through lectures, discussions, and group research projects, students will explore the interaction of state, regional, and international legal regimes – plus individuals, corporations, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, networks, and other nonstate actors – as they address global challenges related to areas like trade and sustainable development, peace and security, trafficking and other crimes, intellectual property, the environment, human rights and the rule of law, and migration. Courses will explore global governance as it relates to private and to public international law, as well as a selected cutting-edge topic. Classes will be taught by leading professors from the United States and Europe, along with expert guest speakers. Students also will benefit from a number of field trips; sites may include the NATO headquarters and the European Parliament, both in Brussels, as well as the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. All classes are taught in English.

Anticipated Enrollment: 15 students from the United States and overall enrollment is capped at 20 students from the United States and 40 students total.

2.     The nature of the relationship with the foreign institution, if any, other than the provision of facilities and minimal services:

The Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies at KU Leuven is a new partner for Georgia Law, although Georgia Law has had a summer study program in Belgium since 1974. The Leuven Centre will provide faculty for two one-credit courses, will organize some guest lectures, cultural and legal excursions, and provide administrative support to the summer program. The Leuven Centre will recruit non-credit participants from Europe and other countries. The Leuven Centre and the Dean Rusk International Law Center will cooperatively plan the Experts’ Conference that is integral to the program.

3.     The number of students who participated in the program the previous year from the sponsoring law school(s) and the number from other schools (if the program is open to other students):

In 2015, there were ___ credit and non-credit participants in the program from the United States, ___, including ___ students from Georgia Law and ___ from other U.S. law schools.

4.     If the program is not limited to students from U.S. law schools, the countries likely to be represented and the expected number of students from those countries:

EU countries and some Central Asian or South American countries are the ones most likely to be represented. The expected number is 15.

5.     Description of each course and number of credit hours:

  • Global Governance Overview (1 credit), taught by Jan Wouters, Jean Monnet Chair ad personam EU and Global Governance, KU Leuven, Director of the Leuven Centre from Global Governance Studies, and Co-Director of the Global Governance Summer School
  • Global Human Rights & Security Governance (1 credit), taught by Diane Marie Amann, Associate Dean for International Programs & Strategic Initiatives and Emily & Ernest Woodruff Chair in International Law, Dean Rusk International Law Center, University of Georgia School of Law, and Co-Director of the Global Governance Summer School
  • Global Economic Governance (1 credit), taught by Harlan G. Cohen, Associate Professor of Law, University of Georgia School of Law
  • Global Governance Practicum (1 credit), taught by Dr. Axel Marx, Deputy Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, KU Leuven, and Kathleen A. Doty, Associate Director for Global Practice Preparation, University of Georgia School of Law

Full course descriptions are coming soon.

6.     Schedule of classes with days and times for each class:

July 10: Arrive in Leuven – welcome, orientation & practicum lecture

July 11: Guided tour of Brussels

July 12: Class: 9-12:30

July 13: Class: 9-12:30

July 14: Class: 9-12:30; Field trip to NATO Headquarters

July 15: Class: 9-12:30

July 16-17 – Free Weekend

July 18: Class: 9-12:30

July 19: Class: 9-12:30; Experts’ Conference in Brussels

July 20: Class: 9-12:30; Experts’ Conference in Brussels

July 21: Class: 9-12:30

July 22: Class: 9-12:30; Tour European Parliament

July 23-24 – Free Weekend – Optional Field Trip to Flanders Fields

July 25: Class: 9-12:30

July 26: Class: 9-12:30; Travel to Luxembourg

July 27: Class: 9-12:30; Tour ECJ, then travel back to Leuven

July 28: Class: 9-12:30; Field trip to Law Firm in Brussels

July 29: Class: 9-12:30; Evening closing banquet

July 30: Check out of housing and depart

A more detailed schedule is coming soon.

7.     Requirements for student performance and grading method:

Grading: The grading system will be the same as that regularly used at the University of Georgia School of Law, available at: http://law.uga.edu/student-handbook-contents#part6. The UGA School of Law utilizes the following grading system:

A+ = 4.3, A = 4.0, A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3, B = 3.0, B- = 2.7
C+ = 2.3, C = 2.0, C- = 1.7
D+ = 1.3, D = 1.0, F = 0.00

I= Incomplete, U = Unsatisfactory, W = Withdraw
WP = Withdraw Passing, WF = Withdraw Failing 
NR = Not Reported, IP = In Progress 
YL = Year-long Course (reported at end of academic year)

Class Attendance: Standard 304(d) of the ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools requires regular and punctual class attendance as a means of fulfilling residency and class hour requirements. Regular and punctual class attendance is an integral part of the learning process. In compliance with the foregoing standard, it is Law School policy that students must attend classes regularly.  Class attendance policy for the summer program will be announced during orientation.

Credit: Each of the four courses will culminate in a 90-minute, in-class exam. Participants who successfully complete the program are eligible to receive 4 ABA-approved hours of academic credit. 

8. Enrollment limitations on any courses offered and criteria for enrollment, including

prerequisites:

Participants must have completed one year of law school at an ABA-accredited institution, or one year of equivalent graduate studies, and be in good standing.

8.     A statement that acceptance of any credit or grade for any course taken in the program, including externships and other clinical offerings, is subject to determination by the student’s home school:

Acceptance of any credit or grade for any course taken in the program is subject to determination by the student’s home institution. Participants are responsible for obtaining approval to transfer credit and information about the possibility of accelerated graduation from their own schools. Transcript request information will be provided to visiting students after completion of the program and individual students are responsible for submitting their own transcript requests with appropriate fees.

9.     Descriptive biographies of program director:

Diane Marie Amann joined the Georgia Law faculty in 2011, taking up the Emily & Ernest Woodruff Chair in International Law; since February 2015, she also has served as the Associate Dean for International Programs & Strategic Initiatives. In the latter capacity, Amann directs Georgia Law’s Dean Rusk International Law Center, a nucleus for global education, scholarship and service for nearly four decades. She also leads strategic initiatives related to the law school’s overall mission.

At Georgia Law, Amann has taught Children & International Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, International Criminal Law, International Human Rights, Laws of War, Public International Law and Refugee & Asylum Law. She is an affiliated faculty member of the university's African Studies Institute, and further serves as the International Criminal Court Prosecutor’s Special Adviser on Children in and Affected by Armed Conflict.

The author of more than four dozen publications in English, French and Italian, Amann focuses her scholarship on the ways that national, regional and international legal regimes interact as they endeavor to combat atrocity and cross-border crime. Among her most recent publications is the American Society of International Law Benchbook on International Law (Diane Marie Amann ed., 2014).

Amann came to Georgia Law from the University of California, Davis, School of Law, where she was a professor of law, the founding director of the California International Law Center and a Martin Luther King Jr. Hall Research Scholar, and from which she received the Distinguished Teaching Award and the Homer Angelo Award for Outstanding Contributions to International Law. She has also served as a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, at the University of California, Los Angeles, and at the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway, and as a professeur invitée at the Université de Paris 1 (Panthéon-Sorbonne).

Before entering academia, she practiced law in San Francisco before state and federal trial courts and before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. She was an assistant federal public defender, a solo federal criminal defense practitioner and a litigation associate at Morrison & Foerster. She also served as a judicial clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, about whom she has written several biographical articles, and for Judge Prentice H. Marshall of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Amann holds a Dr.h.c. degree in law from Universiteit Utrecht in the Netherlands. She earned her J.D. cum laude from Northwestern University, where she served as a note and comment editor of the Northwestern University Law Review and was inducted into the Order of the Coif, her M.A. in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her B.S. in journalism, with highest honors, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Amann is a past vice president of the American Society of International Law and past chair of the Section on International Law of the Association of American Law Schools. She received the 2013 Prominent Women in International Law Award from ASIL’s Women in International Law Interest Group as well as the 2010 Mayre Rasmussen Award for the Advancement of Women in International Law from the American Bar Association's Section of International Law. The founding editor-in-chief of the IntLawGrrls blog from 2007 to 2012, Amann now maintains her own blog. She is a frequent commentator in national and international media.

10.  Descriptive biographies, including academic credentials and experience, of each faculty member responsible for teaching a course or any portion of a course:

  • Jan Wouters, Jean Monnet Chair ad personam EU and Global Governance, KU Leuven, Director of the Leuven Centre from Global Governance Studies, and Co-Director of the Global Governance Summer School

Jan Wouters (°1964) is Jean Monnet Chair ad personam EU and Global Governance, Full Professor of International Law and International Organizations, and founding Director of the Institute for International Law and of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, an interdisciplinary centre of excellence, at the University of Leuven (KU Leuven). In Leuven, he teaches public international law, law of international organizations, the law of the World Trade Organization, space law and international humanitarian law. As Visiting Professor at Sciences Po (Paris), Luiss University (Rome) and the College of Europe (Bruges) he teaches EU external relations law. He is a Member of the Royal Academy of Belgium for Sciences and Arts, is President of the Flemish Foreign Affairs Council and the United Nations Association Flanders Belgium, and practises law as Of Counsel at Linklaters, Brussels. He is Editor of the International Encyclopedia of Intergovernmental Organizations, Deputy Director of the Revue belge de droit international and an editorial board member in ten other international journals. He has published widely on international, EU, corporate and financial law (including more than 50 books, 100 international journal articles and 150 chapters in international books). His recent books include The United Nations and the European Union (2006), Multilevel Regulation and the EU (2008), The Europeanisation of International Law (2008), European Constitutionalism Beyond Lisbon (2009), Belgium in the Security Council (2009) Accountability for Human Rights Violations by International Organizations (2010), Upgrading the EU’s Role as Global Actor (2011), The European Union and Multilateral Governance (2012), International Prosecutors (2012), Informal International Lawmaking (2012), Private Standards and Global Governance  (2012), China, the European Union and Global Governance  (2012), The EU’s Role in Global Governance (2013), National Human Rights Institutions in Europe (2013) and The Law of EU External Relations (2013). Apart from his participation in many international scientific networks, he advises various international organizations and governments, trains international officials and is often asked to comment international events in the media. He is coordinator of a large-scale FP7 Programme FRAME, “Fostering Human Rights Among European (External and Internal) Policies” and of the InBev-Baillet Latour EU China Chair at KU Leuven.

  • Harlan G. Cohen, Associate Professor of Law, University of Georgia School of Law

Specializing in international law, Harlan Grant Cohen joined the Georgia Law faculty in 2007.

Cohen came to Athens from the New York University School of Law, where he was a Furman Fellow and researched national security law, international law and legal history.  His scholarship has appeared in the George Washington, Tulane, Iowa and New York University law reviews and the Yale, Berkeley, NYU and Michigan journals of international law, among other places.

Previously, he worked at the law firm Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and served as a judicial clerk for Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. Cohen also interned in the U.S. Attorney's Office and for U.S. District Court Judge Shira A. Scheindlin, both in the Southern District of New York. Before entering law school, Cohen worked at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and at the journal Foreign Affairs.

In 2013, Cohen was elected to membership in the American Law Institute. Cohen is a member of the executive council of the American Society of International Law, and he served as co-chair of the society’s 106th Annual Meeting. He also serves on the executive committee of the International Legal Theory interest group and is co-chair of the society’s southeast regional interest group.

Cohen earned a dual degree in history and international studies from Yale University before earning his master's in history. In 2003, he graduated magna cum laude from the New York University School of Law, where he was a Florence Allen Scholar and was inducted into the Order of the Coif. Additionally, Cohen served as the articles editor of the New York University Law Review and received the Washington Foreign Law Society's Justice Robert H. Jackson Prize for best published student writing on a topic of international/foreign law.

  • Dr. Axel Marx, Deputy Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, KU Leuven

Axel Marx studied sociology and political science at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, University of Hull and University of Cambridge. He is the deputy director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies. He is in charge of the day-to-day management of the Centre and conducts several externally funded research projects.

  • Kathleen A. Doty, Associate Director for Global Practice Preparation, University of Georgia School of Law

Kathleen A. Doty is the associate director for global practice preparation at Georgia Law’s Dean Rusk International Law Center. Her portfolio includes administration of:  Global Externships; the Brussels Seminar on Global Governance, a four-decades-old summer study abroad offering; exchanges with law faculties overseas; international advocacy; and other academic and research initiatives.

Before joining the center staff in 2015, Doty practiced treaty law in Washington, D.C., as assistant counsel for arms control and international law at the Office of the General Counsel, Strategic Systems Programs, U.S. Department of the Navy. Before that, she was attorney-editor at the D.C.-based American Society of International Law, where her duties included managing the American Journal of International Law and editing publications like ASIL Insights, International Law in Brief, International Legal Materials and the Benchbook on International Law. Her own writings include a note in ILM and a chapter in the Benchbook, as well as a study of transitional justice in Darfur, published in the UC Davis Journal of International Law & Policy, and an analysis of a European Court of Human Rights adoption decision, published in the Tulane Journal of Law & Sexuality

Doty earned her Juris Doctor and a Public Interest Certificate from the University of California-Davis School of Law in 2008, and then was a judicial clerk on the Hawaiʻi Intermediate Court of Appeals. She returned to California-Davis to serve for two years as the inaugural Fellow of its California International Law Center. During that time, she was principal author of the center’s 2011 report, Towards Peace With Justice in Darfur: A Framework for Accountability, and co-instructor of the law school’s Appellate Advocacy course. Her achievements as a law student included competition in the international rounds of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court and the national rounds of the National Moot Court, winner of the Best Brief Award at the National Moot Court and service as a Moot Court board officer. She is an inductee of the Order of Barristers.

Currently, Doty chairs the Non-Proliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament Interest Group of the American Society of International Law. In 2013, she was an NGO observer on behalf of ASIL at the U.N. High Level Meeting of the General Assembly on Nuclear Disarmament, and in 2012, on behalf of the National Institute of Military Justice, she observed Guantánamo military commissions proceedings in the case of Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri. Her observations were published online at Jurist and at IntLawGrrls.

She received her undergraduate degree from Smith College with a major in Latin American Studies and a minor in Film Studies, and she worked for Engel Entertainment as a production assistant and sound recordist for documentaries before pursuing her career in international law. Fluent in Spanish and proficient in French, Doty has worked with community organizations in the Hispanic and French Caribbean and studied abroad at La Universidad de la Habana in Cuba.

11.  Name, address, telephone, e-mail and fax number of an informed contact person at the sponsoring law school:

Kathleen A. Doty

Dean Rusk International Law Center

University of Georgia School of Law

230 Dean Rusk Hall

Athens, GA 30602

Phone: (706) 542-9739

Fax: (706) 542-7822

Email: doty@uga.edu

12.  Complete statement of all tuition, fees, anticipated living costs, and other expected expenses:

University of Georgia tuition rates for summer programs are set in April.

Tuition and Fees:

$3238

Program Fee:

$576

Application Fee:

$ 500 

Visiting student fee*: 

$ 250

*Visiting Students pay an additional $250.00. This fee is waived for Georgia residents, students in the University of Georgia system or member institutions of the SEC. This fee is charged in lieu of higher out-of-state tuition rates, since "visiting" students participating in UGA study abroad programs are charged in-state tuition rates rather than out-of-state rates.

Estimated Total - $3,814 (visiting students: $4,064) Includes class instruction, educational materials, opening reception and farewell dinner, travel insurance, and all organized legal and cultural visits; does not include passport and visa fees, airfare, housing, laundry, most meals.

Estimated Total Program Cost 2016 (subject to change)

Tuition & Fees  (see above for details)

 $3,814 (Visiting students: $4,064)

Hotel lodging (based on double occupancy, incl. tax)

 $1,540

Roundtrip airfare

 $1,800

Meals

    $980

Total

 $8,134 (Visiting students: $8,384)

 

13.  Description and location of classrooms and administrative offices:

All classes will take place in modern classrooms with appropriate technological capabilities on the KU Leuven campus.

14.  The extent to which the country, city, and facilities are accessible to individuals with disabilities:

Public access accommodation in Belgium is not equivalent to standards in the United States. Persons with disabilities should discuss any concerns with the Dean Rusk International Law Center Associate Director for Global Practice Preparation, Kathleen A. Doty. Travelers with disabilities should review the U.S. Department of State’s website at www.travel.state.gov for links to the Country Specific Information for Belgium.

15.  Circumstances under which the program is subject to cancellation, how cancellation will be communicated to the students; what arrangements will be made in the event of cancellation, and information about any prior cancellations, if any:

The University of Georgia School of Law reserves the right to cancel for insufficient enrollment (under 15 for credit participants) or under extraordinary circumstances such as natural disaster, war, political instability or emergency.  In such an event, students will be notified by email and receive a full refund, including the deposit, within twenty (20) days after the cancellation. If requested, the program director will use best efforts to arrange for applicants to enroll in a similar program.

If changes in the course offerings or other significant aspects of the program occur, or if, during the course of the program, a U.S. State Department Travel Warning or Alert is issued for either of the countries in which the program is being conducted, students will be notified promptly personally or by email and given an opportunity to withdraw from the program. Applicants who have paid a deposit or registered for the program and withdrawn under any such circumstances will be refunded fees paid except for room and board payments utilized prior to the date of withdrawal or termination.

16.  State Department Travel Information:

US Department of State website: www.travel.state.gov

Travel Warning and Alerts website: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings.html

Travel Warnings are issued when long-term, protracted conditions that make a country dangerous or unstable lead the State Department to recommend that Americans avoid or consider the risk of travel to that country. A Travel Warning is also issued when the U.S. Government’s ability to assist American citizens is constrained due to the closure of an embassy or consulate or because of a drawdown of its staff.

Travel Alerts are issued to disseminate information about short-term conditions, either transnational or within a particular country, that pose significant risks to the security of U.S. citizens. Natural disasters, terrorist attacks, coups, anniversaries of terrorist events, election-related demonstrations or violence, and high-profile events such as international conferences or regional sports events are examples of conditions that might generate a Travel Alert.

Belgium and Switzerland-Specific Information websites:
http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country/belgium.html

18. Refund policy in the event of student withdrawal as permitted in Section VIII, or program cancellation or termination.

If changes in the course offerings or other significant aspects of the program occur, or if, during the course of the program, a U.S. State Department Travel Warning or Alert is issued for either of the countries in which the program is being conducted, students will be notified promptly personally or by email and given an opportunity to withdraw from the program. Applicants who have paid a deposit or registered for the program and withdrawn under any such circumstances will be refunded fees paid except for room and board payments utilized prior to the date of withdrawal or termination.

19. Description of the housing made available by the program. (See criterion V.I.F.)

Students will have access to excellent, convenient housing at competitive rates (prices based on current rate of exchange). The Dean Rusk International Law Center will make reservations in cooperation with participants. Full payment of housing costs is the responsibility of each participant.

In Leuven, housing will be available at the Leuven Institute for Ireland in Europe. Each room will have an internet connection, an in-suite bathroom, and daily maid service. Breakfast is included. Students can choose from the following options (approximate prices are per night and include tax): quadruple and triple occupancy suites are $55 per person; double occupancy suites are $71 per person; or single occupancy rooms are $115.